Cultural Postcards + [Pakistan]

More Stuff: Ruins of ancient Sirkap left ‘unprotected’
Despite being protected under the Antiquities Act and listed in Unesco’s “world cultural heritage site,” Sirkap, the second ancient city of Taxila, is in a shambles owing to the apathy of the archaeology department.

Ruins of ancient Sirkap left ‘unprotected’
Ruins of ancient City of Sirkap, the Indo-Greek archaeological site, located near ancient
Taxila in Punjab Province, Pakistan [Credit: Dawoodmajoka/WikiCommons]

The signboards for tourists’ information are almost unreadable, and if tourists visit the area they are greeted by wild grass and broken benches. A large number of local and foreign tourists visit the ruins of this important city of the ancient Taxila civilisation.

However, they are stunned to see the poor condition of the site and lack of tourist facilities as almost 70 per cent of the ruins are covered with wild grass and bushes.

Two boards have been installed at the site for the information of the tourists.

One of the boards shows the map plan of the city and the other, written in both English and Urdu languages, mentions the historical background of the remains.

Ruins of ancient Sirkap left ‘unprotected’
Stupa from first century BC [Credit: Dawoodmajoka/WikiCommons]

However, even these two boards have not been maintained and have become unreadable.

Another information board on Pena flex is also in tatters and needs urgent repair.

It may be mentioned that the remains of Sirkap belonged to four distinct periods of pre-Greek, Greeks, Scythians and Parthians. The city was founded approximately in the first quarter of the 2nd century BC by the Bactrian Greek king Menander.

The city was well planned and fortified. The builders introduced their ionic and Corinthian orders of architecture at Sirkap.

The Greek influence enhanced further under their successors Scythians and Parthians.

Source: The Gulf Today [April 26, 2014]