Cultural Postcards + [Southern Europe]

Italy: Riace bronzes not to be displayed at Milan Expo 2015
The debate regarding the shipping of the world famous Riace bronzes to be displayed at Expo 2015 seems to be resolved, at last.

Riace bronzes not to be displayed at Milan Expo 2015
They were willing to risk the world-famous Greek Riace 
bronzes for cash [Credit: Protothema]

According to an announcement released by the official site of Expo 2015, the next scheduled Universal Exposition will take place without the world famous Greek Riace bronzes, at least in Milan.

As Artnet news reports, President of the Lombardy region Roberto Maroni and art critic Vittorio Sgarbi wrote a letter to the Italian culture minister Dario Franceschini a few days ago, outlining their request for the loan of the two famous sculptures, so that they can be displayed at the prestigious event to be held in Milan, Italy, between 1 May and 31 October 2015.

According to the two men, claims regarding the Riace Bronzes’ fragility have been grossly overstated in an attempt to keep them, and the economic boon they create via tourism, confined to Calabria, their current home.

In return, Maroni and Sgarbi have offered one third of the ticket sales related to the Riace Bronzes to go to Calabria.

However, it was decided that neither sculpture will be moved to Milan for the Expo. The Committee of the National Museum of Reggio Calabria stated that the bronzi  “are too fragile” to be moved.

Riace bronzes not to be displayed at Milan Expo 2015
The Riace bronzes are two famous full-size Greek bronzes of 
naked bearded warriors [Credit: Protothema]

The sculptures

The Riace bronzes (Italian Bronzi di Riace), also called the Riace Warriors, are two famous full-size Greek bronzes of naked bearded warriors, cast about 460–420 BC and found in the sea near Riace in 1972.

They are currently housed at the Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia in a climate controlled room on pedestals designed to minimize even the slightest movement due to seismic or other activity. First discovered in 1972, they underwent nine years of conservation before emerging in 1981. They recently underwent a second round of restoration from 2010–2011 while the museum was also undergoing renovations.

Source: Protothema News [August 25, 2015]